Relationship between a concentration of lipoprotein-associated secretory phospholipase A2 and markers of subclinical atherosclerotic lesion of arterial wall in patients with low and moderate risk by SCORE scale

  • Authors: Urazalina S.Z.1, Titov V.N.1, Vlasik T.N.1, Balakhonova T.V.1, Karpov Y.A.1, Kukharchuk V.V.1, Boytsov SA1, Urazalina SG2, Titov VN2, Vlasik TN2, Balakhonova TV2, Karpov Y.A2, Kukharchuk VV2, Boitsov SA2
  • Affiliations:
    1. Russian Cardiological Research Center, Moscow
  • Issue: Vol 83, No 9 (2011)
  • Pages: 29-35
  • Section: Editorial
  • URL: https://ter-arkhiv.ru/0040-3660/article/view/30904
  • Cite item

Abstract


Aim. To show relations between a concentration of lipoprotein-associated secretory phospholipase A2 (LPPLa2) and markers of subclinical atherosclerotic lesion of the arterial wall in patients with low and moderate risk by the SCORE scale.
Material and methods. A total of 378 individuals with low and moderate risk of atherosclerotic lesion of the arterial wall (285 females, 93 males) were divided into groups by 1) age and sex, 2) number of atherosclerotic plaques (ASP) in the carotid arteries: 0ASP (n = 158), ASP (n = 61), more than one ASP (n = 159); 3) plaque characteristics: homogeneous (n = 31), heterogenous (n = 189), 4) the presence of ASP in CA and level of LPPLa2 in the blood (with high content - n = 137, with normal content - n = 83). Duplex CA scanning was made to estimate intima-media thickness (IMT), to detect AP in the CA. Computer sphygmography estimated velocity of the pulse wave (PWV) from the carotid to femoral artery. Normal values of IMT and PWV were estimated individually with reference to gender and age. LPPLa2 was measured immunoturbodimetrically using diagnostic kits (PLAC Test Elisa Kit, diaDexus, USA), shreshold value < 200 ng/ml.
Results. LPPLa2 content medians in different age groups in males and females differed insignificantly. LPPLa2 concentration in the groups of patients regarding ASP in CA was elevated in relation to the threshold value (200 ng/ml) in all the groups but did not significantly differ: 216 (179-257) ng/ml in the group 0ASP, 226 (190-274) ng/ml - in the group of patients 1ASP and 212 (174-254) ng/ml - in the group of patients more than one ASP (p > 0.05). In the groups with homogeneous and heterogenous ASP significant differencies were neither between the medians nor between frequency of deviation from normal (p = 0.28). 25.5% patients from the group with an elevated level of LPPLa2 had ASP with a hypoechogenic component.
Conclusion. No significant correlation was revealed between concentration of LPPLa2, IMT PWV, number of ASP and carotid stenosis.

About the authors

Saule Zhaksylykovna Urazalina

Email: surazalina@mail.ru

Vladimir Nikolaevich Titov

Tat'yana Nikolaevna Vlasik

Tat'yana Valentinovna Balakhonova

Yuriy Aleksandrovich Karpov

Valeriy Vladimirovich Kukharchuk

S A Boytsov

S G Urazalina

Russian Cardiological Research Center, Moscow

Russian Cardiological Research Center, Moscow

V N Titov

Russian Cardiological Research Center, Moscow

Russian Cardiological Research Center, Moscow

T N Vlasik

Russian Cardiological Research Center, Moscow

Russian Cardiological Research Center, Moscow

T V Balakhonova

Russian Cardiological Research Center, Moscow

Russian Cardiological Research Center, Moscow

Yu A Karpov

Russian Cardiological Research Center, Moscow

Russian Cardiological Research Center, Moscow

V V Kukharchuk

Russian Cardiological Research Center, Moscow

Russian Cardiological Research Center, Moscow

S A Boitsov

Russian Cardiological Research Center, Moscow

Russian Cardiological Research Center, Moscow

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